Type in the content of your page here.


Fiona St. Claire is a novelist best known for her "Dark Shadows" vampire series. She was born in Mystic, Connecticut in 1965 and lives in Atlanta. Her books have sold millions of copies, but she has never won a major award.
==Contents==
[]
* 1 Biography

[edit]Biography

St. Claire is a pen name for Sabrina Ray, though Ray insists the St. Claire name is "not a pseudonym, exactly, but an alter ego." Ray's father was a mailman and her mother owned a dress shop. When she was fifteen, her father was found dead in a hotel in New York City. The experience affected her deeply, driving her toward various kinds of spiritual investigation. After a checkered career in college -- she attended four schools in five years -- she spent two years as a graduate student in the religion department at Columbia University.
Since St. Claire published her first book, she has maintained a mysterious persona. She wears sunglasses indoors, avoids unnatural lighting and eats blueberries every day at midnight. She also communicates with her fans primarily through her Twitter page.

[edit]Works

After dropping out of graduate school, St. Claire began work as an editorial assistant at a romance publishing house, a job that led directly to her authorship of a successful series of mythological romances under the name Loretta St. Marks. Her greatest success began in 2002, when she published the first book in the Dark Shadows series, Dark Thoughts. It became a huge seller, and was followed quickly by a pair of sequels, My Darklyng and Dark Impaling.
Her next book Dark Passages is coming out Summer 2010.

[edit]Controversy

In 2006 she was accused of lifting passages from an unpublished Charlaine Harris manuscript. The charges were later dropped. Another controversy arose in May 2010 when her publisher was at odds with Amazon and she delivered a speech at the Emerson Straights School in Dale County, Georgia, where she demanded that all the students buy copies of her latest book or torch her publisher's office. She told a reporter from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that it was a joke.

[edit]